The circle of Poverty

Circle

 The best anti-poverty program is a world-class education.

Barack Obama

In Laredo, a significant number of children live in poverty.

Low educational levels lead to low motivation to stay in school and many students drop out, and thus their opportunities to break the cycle of poverty are greatly reduced.

Break the cycle of poverty depends on you. Take the opportunity you have to study and break the cycle that passes the burdens of poverty from one generation to the next.

free

Early College

The Early College High School provides students the opportunity to receive a high school diploma and two years of college credit (or an Associate degree), free. (The tuition of two years at college worth more than $28,000) Early college students are outperforming their peers nationwide, 90% graduate high school vs. 78% of students nationally; 94% earn free college credit while in high school.

Many of my former students could realize their dreams through the LISD Early College. You can also achieve the success you deserve.

ECHS School

Laredo Early College High School – Where dreams are ignited by the flames of knowledge.

 

EC today

 

Top 5 benefits of Early College

Meet your Teacher

When meeting a new teacher, students are ONLY interested in knowing the answers to questions like:

Who is my teacher?


I teach because I want to make a difference.  I am a teacher who is committed to helping students to succeed in school while nurturing their unconditional self-acceptance, and emotional wellbeing. I believe in teaching with compassion, dedication, and enthusiasm. My mission is to create a caring, and empathetic group of students, that develop a love of learning that will last a lifetime, and I hope that within each one of them, I can ignite a fire that will inspire them to believe, grow, and seek knowledge to figure out what moves them to make a difference in the world.

 

What are the rules in the classroom?

 

Be on time every day

Any student who was absent must attend tutorials the following day in order to receive instruction, so as not to fall behind in his/her missing assignments.

Be on Task

Listen and follow directions. Be prompt, attentive, and participate in class. Try to do your best at all times!

Be responsible

Any student who does not complete the homework will be required to stay for the day the homework was due to complete missing homework to provide content reinforcement needed.

Be safe

Any running or other safety violation will result in after school detention. Time to be determined by the teacher.

Be Courteous

Follow the Golden Rule; treat others as you wish to be treated.

Do not use inflammatory or offensive language, sarcasm, or raised voices.

Be responsible for your own learning.

Come to class prepared in every way to learn and participate. Work quietly.

Always do your best.

Have pride on all you do, and Never give up!

Turn off and put away any personal electronic device.

The learning process requires a distraction-free learning environment.

 

Be Positive, Productive, Polite, Prepared, and ResPectful  (the 5 Ps).

 

Why is this class important to me?

Math is incredibly important in our lives. Math is used in everyday life. mathematics gives us the critical ability to learn and think logically. Math skills are important for all kinds of jobs, from retail cashier to stockbroker. For many jobs, using math is a daily part of the work.

Students will become adults who will use math in their jobs. All kinds of careers use math; for example electronics, civil and structural engineering,  accountants, doctors, bankers, meteorologists, game designers, robotics designers, and even mothers use math.

What are we learning in this class?

The major math strands for seventh-grade curriculum are number sense and operations, arithmetic with negative numbers, algebra basics, proportions, geometry and spatial sense, measurement, and data analysis and probability.

Number sense topics include exponents and scientific notation; prime numbers; factoring; combining like terms; substituting values for variables; simplification of algebraic expressions; and calculating rate, distance, time, and mass.

Students will learn to evaluate expressions, generate equivalent expressions, and efficiently solve equations and inequalities. Also, they will apply the properties of operations to work efficiently with expressions and equations.

Students will investigate proportional relationships and use this understanding to solve real-world problems involving discounts, interest, taxes, and scale drawings.

Geometric topics include the classification of angles and triangles; finding the unknown measurement of a triangle’s side, and determining the slope of a line. Students will study two-dimensional and three-dimensional figures and will learn how to find perimeter, area, angle measures, and volume and surface area of solids.

Students will also learn to use a variety of graphs to represent data and to interpret those graphs, and they will learn to compute odds. Students will be introduced to mean, median, and mode.

Welcome To My Math Class

What you will be learning this year in Mathematics:

Standards
Snapshot
Reference
Sheet
Year at Glance

 

We use technology every day in this class.

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Why should you be learning all of this material? :
1. This material is important because you will be applying it to real life.
2. We will be using examples of real things that you may or may not have already done in your life.
How will you be learning this material? :
1. Through fun lessons that keep you involved.
2. You will have notes to take, but you will also be doing projects, to help you and your fellow students.
3. Daily homework assignments will also be given in order for you to practice those days material and so that you may reflect on what you learned.
4. Some of the projects will be done in groups, as well as some of the in class activities. I want you to be able to figure some things out for yourselves using prior knowledge and knowledge that you have gained in this class.
Optional supplies that you will need for the year:
1.  Two pencils and one red ink pen.
2.  Two-Grid Notebooks for notes and homework.
3.  Two  2 Pocket with Prongs Paper Portfolio for your homework, and other class papers.
4.  Your Mathematics books.
5.  Two dry-erase markers
Grading policy
Grading policy is subject to requirements quoted in the LISD handbooks.

Grading is not about a number; but instead, is an assessment of what the student learned about the curriculum being taught.

Formative Assessments:      50%

The average of all Formative Assessments will be counted as 50% of your six -weeks grade.

  • Formal Assessments: (CBAs, STAAR)
  • Informal Assessments: (Weekly Exams, Pre-Tests, Ongoing Assessments, Cumulative Tests).     

 Tests will fall every Friday.

Summative Assessments: 50%

  • Daily Work: (Participation, Quizzes, Classwork, Warm-Ups, Exit Slips, Drills, Problem of the Day, and other small assignments)
  • Homework

The average of all daily work [Summative Assessments] (Drills/DCR, homework, and assignments) will be counted as 50% of your six- weeks grade.

Make Up/ Late Work will have a 50% of the value of the assignment (unless a legitimate illness).    

Missing Assignments are automatically assessed at a score of 0

Quizzes may be administered at any time and may or may not be announced.
All tests and quizzes must be corrected and placed in your binder by the following Monday. Corrected Math binders will be checked at this time as well.
Homework assignments are posted on Ms. Garcia’s blog and will be turned in at the beginning of the next class.
Your six – weeks Math binder has a weight of a test grade each time that it is checked. It will be checked at the end of every six weeks.
A maximum of 100 pts. may be gained on each daily assignment with regard to percent correct and complete.
A maximum of 100 pts. may be gained on each test assignment.
Any assignment not received at collection but still on that same day will be reduced by 10 points.
Any assignment received the following day will be reduced by 50 points.
All work will be completed satisfactorily at my discretion.
My grading policy is subject to change according to the policy of the School District.
Grading Scale:
A 90-00 Excellent
B 80-89 Very good
C 70-79 Satisfactory
D 60-69 Inconsistent
E 0-59 Unsatisfactory
Attendance Policy:
Regular school attendance is essential for the student to make the most of his/her education-to benefit from teacher-led activities, to build each day’s learning on the previous days, and to grow as an individual.
Attendance is important. You’re in class every day to learn, keep up with class assignments, pass your classes, and prepare for state mandated tests.
A student is required to attend all class meetings. If a class is missed the student is held responsible for the full requirements of the class.
Students lose credit automatically after the 8th absence (excused or unexcused. There is no distinction between an excused and an unexcused absence. Both will be counted equally.
 Please be aware of two very important rules:
* A student absent from school for any reason, upon returning school, must bring a note signed by the parent that describes the reason for the absence. An absence slip will be required to return to class.
* The student has to make up work missed due to any absence within two school days.

 

* The student should be prepared to turn-in the homework and other assignment(s) upon returning to school

.

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good tings

Bathroom Policy:

If you have to go to the bathroom, you must raise your hand and ask to do so. You must sign the Sign In/Sign Out notebook and get a pass before you leave the room (one boy and one girl at a time). You will not be allowed to leave the room during the first 10 minutes or last 10 minutes of a period. You will not be allowed to leave during the 1st and 6th periods.

——– Make your education a top priority.———-

 

I firmly believe that most people can be successful in school and that the amount of hard work, dedication, and sacrifice is what separates those who are successful from those who are not.

      If you are absent, you want to get the assignments and notes as fast as you can. If you can, call your classmates and ask them for the assignments. If you can’t call anyone, you should ask your  classmates for the work in the morning on the day that you get back.
This site is NOT meant to be a replacement for lessons taught or activities done in class. 

“There are no secrets to success. It is the result of preparation, hard work, and learning from failure.” – Colin Powell

list

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Dear Parents and Students,
Welcome to my Math Blog where you will find some of the different activities we do in class daily.
This year many students of Memorial Middle School are taking their Math lessons with me. This is an exciting experience for all of us and we hope to learn and have fun at the same time.
It is my ultimate goal to help students understand and like the Math subject.
I hope this site helps you understand what we do in class every day. Please do not hesitate to ask me questions or to suggest changes to my blog.
See you around,
Ms. Garcia 
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Do you need help with a topic that is not on this site?
Would you like this site to provide a link that has been helpful to you?
Is there a link that does not work properly?
Do you have other questions/concerns?
If so, please e-mail me at mggarcia042@laredoisd.org
——–

 

Overindulgent Parents, Underachieving Children

As a teacher, I have always believed that our mission transcends the task of simply transmitting knowledge, and calls upon us to give children the means to succeed in life. I also believe that we should not limit ourselves to teaching our students the standard curriculum in Math, Science, and English, but should also give them the tools to be effective parents themselves when the time comes.

Regrettably, no one teaches us how to be parents, and when the time comes, we often confront the challenge by improvising and learning on the job from our repeated mistakes. As parents, we often go to one extreme or the other: We become overprotective of our children or give them too little protection. This leads to some kids being shielded from all their responsibilities and being unable to do anything on their own, and others being left to fend for themselves in the absence of any supervision. Good parenting requires us to strike a balance between protecting them and letting them discover the world on their own.

One of the major problems that I have encountered as a teacher is that of overindulgent parents, who—in their desire to protect their children—keep them in their comfort zone; this ends up sabotaging their academic achievement. I know from experience that there are some parents who often do their children’s homework and other academic work, because the youngsters are unable to understand the concepts in the work sent home by the teachers for further study. Worse still, since the teachers are under the impression that the students have already mastered the concepts, they do not schedule any further review of the topic. This does not help our students; it has the opposite effect, because it encourages irresponsibility and deceit. These habits will, in the long run, end up hindering the chances of academic success.

As teachers, we must contend with the myriad of excuses that parents give to explain why their children did not do their homework; some excuses are very creative, but most are very run-of-the-mill. Parents often make excuses to explain their children’s absence from class—such as excessive medical appointments, family illness, unavoidable social gatherings, or frequent out-of-town trips.

every-day

If a teacher tells parents that their children need to come to class every day and to avoid being absent unless absolutely necessary, some parents may consider this an aggressive stance. Some parents find it easier to change teachers than to change their children’s attitude. Sometimes, it is not even the attitude of the children that is at fault, but rather that of the parents, who have no confidence in the children’s ability to perform, and who promote a culture of minimum effort that in effect condemns the students to mediocrity.

Parents should strive to create in their children the habits of responsibility, perseverance, self-confidence, self-discipline, thinking big, and aspiring to a better future. This will sow the seeds of greatness in their children, so allowing them to stand out and succeed in every endeavor they may pursue.

In contrast, parents who overprotect their children and let them get away with bad habits—such as avoiding responsibility, making excessive excuses to avoid doing any work, behaving disruptively, and having too much leisure time—may inadvertently be condemning their children to failure.

Many high achievers attribute their success to what their parents taught them about how to do things on their own and to their resultant belief that if they try hard enough, they will succeed.

If you, as parents, want your children to succeed, it is important that you believe in them, and promote in them the confidence that they can succeed in anything they set their mind to achieving. Encourage good habits in them—such as working hard, being responsible, and not settling for low or average grades—in other words, endeavoring to be the best they can through constant effort and an unwavering desire to succeed.

There is a proven recipe for success that I would like to share with you:

Success is simple. Do what’s right, the right way, at the right time.

Arnold H. Glasow

Why study

A truly moving exhortation

Often I tell my students to be diligent in their studies and to take advantage of this great opportunity they have to study because it is one of the best ways to succeed in life. I tell you that the future is built day by day with the decisions we make and the actions we take. Triumph is not chance; it is causality. It is the result of a lot of work accumulated over time, aimed at achieving our goals. I tell you that your current education is the foundation on which you will build your future opportunities for education, employment, and economic prosperity

Possibly I do it as I remember the words of my father who always insisted on the need to study to be able to get ahead. Dad always insisted that the best legacy a father can leave to his children is education. My experience in life has shown me the wisdom of his words.

Of all my classmates in elementary school, only a few finished our professional education, possibly less than 10%. When I meet with friends and colleagues of those years, I see the enormous economic difference and even health of those who studied for a career and those who did not.

Long ago in a meeting with parents and their children, I commented that many students did not do their homework, did not attend extra class tutoring and failed midterm exams not because of lack of ability, but because of the lack of discipline and perseverance required by their studies. They spent more time chatting or social networking or going out on dates, than studying. I commented that many of the students think that the main reason for attending school is to socialize and play on sports teams. In some cases, they only cared about passing their subjects so that they could play.

A mom stopped and asked to speak. He told his daughter and classmates the following:

“Not so long ago I was sitting like you, without any concern. By not putting interest in my studies I left the school without completing anything. I want to tell you that it is the biggest mistake I have ever made in life and that I regret every day. Referring to her daughter, she said: When I left school I got pregnant, and since you were born, I had to work, and I have not stopped doing it ever since. She exposed her arms and showed us all many small burns. I’m working on burgers and tacos, she said, I’m standing in front of the grill every day for more than 8 hours, without having a minute to sit down, I often burn my arms because a lot of small incidents happen in a commercial kitchen. My legs are varicose due to many hours standing at work. My salary has hardly increased in years, and I have very few satisfactions. But I repeat to myself: it’s worth it because my children have food and home and the opportunity to study.

Do not make my mistakes she told her daughter, study, study for a career and succeed; it is very difficult to earn a living if you do not have preparation.”

We were all silent, our eyes tearful at the honest and touching testimony of a mother, who for the first time commented on the daily sacrifice she made to get her children ahead.

I share this experience because many times we do not know the great sacrifice that parents make so that you can study and have an opportunity to overcome.

Pretty Good, By Charles Osgood*

There once was a pretty good student.
Who sat in a pretty good class
And was taught by a pretty good teacher.
Who always let pretty good pass.

He wasn’t terrific at reading;
He wasn’t a whiz-bang at math;
But for him education was leading
Straight down a pretty good path.

He didn’t find school too exciting,
But he wanted to do pretty well.
And he did have some trouble with writing,
And nobody had taught him to spell.

When doing arithmetic problems,
Pretty good was regarded as fine;
Five and five needn’t always add up to be ten.
A pretty good answer was nine.

The pretty good student was happy
With the standards that were in effect.
And nobody thought it was sappy
If his answers were not quite correct.

The pretty good class that he sat in
Was part of a pretty good school.
And the student was not an exception;
On the contrary, he was the rule.

The pretty good school that he went to
Was right there in a pretty good town.
And nobody there ever noticed
He could not tell a verb from a noun.

The pretty good student, in fact, was
A part of a pretty good mob,
And the first time he knew what he lacked was
When he looked for a pretty good job.

It was then, when he sought a position,
He discovered that life can be tough,
And he soon had a sneaky suspicion
Pretty good might not be good enough.

The pretty good town in our story
Was part of a pretty good state
Which had pretty good aspirations
and prayed for a pretty good fate.

There was once a pretty good nation.
Pretty proud of the greatness it had.
But which learned much too late.
If you want to be great,
Pretty good is, in fact, pretty bad.

*Source: http://leedeth.wordpress.com/2007/02/27/pretty-good-by-charles-osgood/

Happy New Year

Every problem has a solution, every student has talent.

This new year make full use of your potential and talent.

Learn from your mistakes, and accomplish your goals for the future.

Happy new year to all my dear students.

Mrs. Garcia

 

A New Year’s Prayer
Author Unknown

May God make your year a happy one!
Not by shielding you from all sorrows and pain,
But by strengthening you to bear it, as it comes;

Not by making your path easy,
But by making you sturdy to travel any path;

Not by taking hardships from you,
But by taking fear from your heart;

Not by granting you unbroken sunshine,
But by keeping your face bright, even in the shadows;

Not by making your life always pleasant,
But by showing you when people and their causes need you most,
and by making you anxious to be there to help.

God’s love, peace, hope and joy to you for the year ahead.